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My Inspiration

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I have many things that inspire me both in my work and in my personal life. Incredible life stories,  arts, and nature are some to them. Yet, my biggest passion is dancing. I have been dancing since 1994 and moved all the way from dancing competitively (ballroom style) to perceiving dancing as a meaningful and healing activity that allows to connect with self and the world around.

As I was exploring many different styles, flamenco, belly dancing,  modern dance, ballet, Argentine tango, Brazilian Samba and Zouk, and others, I was constantly finding more and more parallels between dancing and real life. On this page, I want to share with you true “gems” borrowed from some of my dance teachers and partners that inspired me far beyond the dance floor.

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"Use your core!"
 

Betania Antico

Ballet and Pilates Instructor

Esch, Luxembourg

In Dance...

Betania was teaching proper posture to initiate any type of move. Engaging the core (tightening the pelvic floor and abductors) is never visible from the outside, yet, this "secret" work it fundamental to have proper control over the move, be it walking, jumping, or pivoting.

In Real Life...

Once we align and engage our deep-down core (values, needs, real motives, and aspirations) we become truly efficient and effective in doing anything we choose to.

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  1. “Be assertive!” Charles Nkoho, Dance partner exploring many different styles.

“Be assertive!”

 

Charles Nkoho

Dance partner

Washington D.C., USA

In Dance...

Charles and I switched roles as I was practicing my dance leading skills. My initial lead was too gentle and he could not read it. Being an assertive leader meant stepping out of my comfort zone and using a lot more power, than I was used to as a follower.

In Real Life...

Assuming leadership role is critical to success. We need our leadership skills to express our needs, generate new ideas and design our own unique “dance of life”.  Being an assertive leader takes courage, confidence, and a clear vision on what we want to achieve.

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  1. “Be assertive!” Charles Nkoho, Dance partner exploring many different styles.

“Be light and ready!”

 

Diana Mestre

Argentine Tango Teacher

Buenos Aires, Argentina

In Dance...

Diana was referring to the role of the follower who should be always well-tuned to the leader to be able to quickly respond to the impulse coming from him/her.

In Real Life...

The concept of followership is exactly the opposite from leadership yet, to be successful, we need to embrace both skills. In situations when we have a limited control, or no control at all, there is a huge value in being a conscious follower. Surrendering to the flow and making something fun out of it (which is what a follower in Argentine tango does) is an important characteristic of adaptability.

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  1. “Be assertive!” Charles Nkoho, Dance partner exploring many different styles.

You should be able to dance on any type of floor!”

 

Luis Angel

Argentine Tango Teacher

Washington D.C., USA

In Dance...

Luis Angel was referring to the need to adapt dancing technique to any types of floors, be it a more sticky vinyl that makes it hard to pivot, or a slippery laminate where you can easily loose balance if you use too much power while moving.  

In Real Life...

This is another dimension of adaptability. Life is full of surprises and we don't always find perfect conditions that we are used to. When we are able  to “tweak our technique” to match  unexpected challenges we unlock many more opportunities to shine while performing our "dance of life".

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  1. “Be assertive!” Charles Nkoho, Dance partner exploring many different styles.

“When you dance you bring water to thirsty people. But not a cup - an ocean!”

 

Dee Hale

Samba Music and Dance Teacher

Washington D.C., USA

In Dance...

Dee was referring to the way Samba dancers should interact with public during public performances. While it’s important to have a good dancing technique, what makes a dancer a true “sambista” is the ability to engage with  people around, be it a circle of friends, or crowds watching a street parade.

In Real Life...

Our ability to share ourselves with the world shapes the quality of our relationships, both in personal life and at work. Sharing with open heart, without measuring how much have we given and what can we expect in exchange, is the ultimate condition of true and meaningful connection.